Eerie Photographs of Russia’s Forgotten Future

In the midst of the freezing winter, Russian photographer Danila Tkachenko travels to remote places where abandoned relics of Soviet innovation lie decaying. Surrounded by the snowy scenery, they stand out as ghostly reminders of Russia’s past: ambitions and a dream of utopia. His photo series, Restricted Areas, shows the human desire for constant improvement and when those desires fail us.

Any progress comes to its end earlier or later, what’s interesting for me is to witness what remains after.

You can find many more images from the series by Danila Tkachenko, winner of this year’s European Publishers Award for Photography, on his website. Also be sure to see his remarkable series, Escape, where he visited hermits who have decided to escape from social life and lived all alone in the wild nature, far away from any villages, towns or other people.

The world’s largest diesel submarine

The world’s largest diesel submarine

Deserted observatory located in the area with the best conditions for space observations.

Deserted observatory located in the area with the best conditions for space observations.

An antenna built for interplanetary connection. The Soviet Union was planning to build bases on other planets, and prepared facilities for connection which were never used and now lie dormant.

An antenna built for interplanetary connection. The Soviet Union was planning to build bases on other planets, and prepared facilities for connection which were never used and now lie dormant.

Three former residential buildings in an abandoned polar scientific town, which specialised in biological research.

Three former residential buildings in an abandoned polar scientific town, which specialised in biological research.

Ground station for spacecraft control.

Ground station for spacecraft control.

 Sarcophagus over a closed shaft which is 4 km deep. This was one of the deepest scientific shafts in the world at the time.


Sarcophagus over a closed shaft which is 4 km deep. This was one of the deepest scientific shafts in the world at the time.

Add Comment