To force kids to pay for sledding, park in Kaliningrad dumps sand on popular slope

sled

There is not much to do in long winter in Kaliningrad, so kids along with parent enjoy sledding down the hills. However, Kaliningrad park administration decided to dump sand on a popular slope used by children and families for years. Reportedly, the reason behind it, was to increase the attendance on paid area for sledding.

They explained, that the hill used by kids does not meet the requirements of safety. Instead, kids can use paid sledding and tubing hill where a single ride costs 50 rubles ($0,6).

The city administration has invested about 2 million rubles into construction of the paid tubing hill and it still has not paid off.

Residents of the city say that they used to go sled on the hill for years. As the proof, some even found old, pre-World War II photographs of Koenigsberg residents using the hill for sledding.

The story went viral on RUnet:

"This could be used as an explanation for kids, why a state monopoly is a bad thing."

“This could be used as an explanation for kids, why a state monopoly is a bad thing.”

Others offered to blame Obama for this.

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Here is the picture from a different angle. The free slope is very dangerous since it ends with a river and trees. My sister broke her arm in her childhood there. However, I don't support the city administration. This was purely Soviet way of solving the problem. Instead of thinking how to solve the problem, it's easier to impose a ban.

Here is the picture from a different angle.
The free slope is very dangerous since it ends with a river and trees. My sister broke her arm in her childhood there. However, I don’t support the city administration. This was purely Soviet way of solving the problem. Instead of thinking how to solve the problem, it’s easier to impose a ban.

"No cash, no sledding" commented the director of children's activities, while waving his whip.

“No cash, no sledding” commented the director of children’s activities, while waving his whip.

Last summer, a music band had a concert in that park. To make it difficult to listen for free, park officials made music louder at nearby children's attractions. This is despite the fact that all the seats were sold out.

Last summer, a music band had a concert in that park. To make it difficult to listen for free, park officials made music louder at nearby children’s attractions. This is despite the fact that all the seats were sold out.

Update: Ella Kadochnikova, the park’s director, elaborated that sand was poured in front of trees on a stretch of snow no longer than 3 meters (10 feet). “We didn’t intend to deter kids from sledding. The sand is all over the hill only because children making their way to the top don’t go up the dedicated path, but walk directly up the slope, dragging the sand on their boots and sleds,” she said.

H/T @KevinRothrock

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